Distribution of contaminant trace metals inadvertently provided by phosphorus fertilisers: movement, chemical fractions and mass balances in contrasting acidic soils

Mauricio Molina-Roco, Mónica Antilén, Nicolás Arancibia-Miranda, Karen Manquián-Cerda, Aldo M. Escudey Castro, Aldo M. Escudey Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The frequent use of phosphorus (P) fertilisers accompanied by nitrogen and potassium sources may lead to a serious long-term environmental issue because of the presence of potentially hazardous trace metals (TM) in P fertilisers and unknown effects on the TM chemical fractions in agricultural soils. A 16-month-long column experiment was conducted to investigate the mobility and chemical forms of Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Zn introduced into a Mollisol and an Andisol through surface incorporation (0–2 cm) of triple superphosphate (TSP) fertiliser. The effects of urea and potassium chloride (KCl) applications were investigated as well. After 15 cycles of 300-mm irrigation, TSP addition increased the 4 M HNO3 extractable TM concentration in the upper (0–5 cm) section of soils. Beyond this depth, metals showed no significant mobility, with minimal leaching losses (< 1.9%, 25-cm depth). The TM chemical forms in the 0–5 cm section were significantly (p < 0.01) affected by the soil type and fertilisers addition. Cadmium, Ni, and Zn were the elements which appeared in a larger proportion (up to 30%) in the most labile fraction (KNO3 extractable) in fertilised soils. The impact of urea depended on the nitrification-related changes in soil pH, while fertilisation with KCl tended to increase the KNO3 fraction of most metals probably due to K+ exchange reactions. Chromium remained minimally affected by the urea and KCl applications since this contaminant is strongly bound to the less labile solid phases. The low mobility of TM was governed mainly by their interaction with the solid phases rather than by their speciation at soil pH. The mass balance showed that the geochemical processes underwent in time by the P fertiliser increased the amount of TM extracted by the chemical fractionation scheme, therefore the reaction period of TSP with soil particles should be taken into account for evaluating TM availability. Long-term soil fertilisation could inadvertently contribute to an increased concentration and availability of these P fertilisers-born contaminants in the cultivated layer of acidic soils.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1-19
Number of pages19
JournalEnvironmental Geochemistry and Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 6 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Fertilizers
Phosphorus
trace metal
mass balance
fertilizer
Impurities
phosphorus
Soils
pollutant
superphosphate
urea
soil
Urea
Potassium
Andisol
Mollisol
potassium chloride
Metals
Availability
metal

Keywords

  • Heavy metals
  • Sequential extraction
  • Soil contamination
  • Triple superphosphate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Distribution of contaminant trace metals inadvertently provided by phosphorus fertilisers : movement, chemical fractions and mass balances in contrasting acidic soils. / Molina-Roco, Mauricio; Antilén, Mónica; Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolás; Manquián-Cerda, Karen; Escudey Castro, Aldo M.; Escudey Castro, Aldo M.

In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 06.06.2018, p. 1-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3f9304433a5e499a8d7aa3eb7ebf346d,
title = "Distribution of contaminant trace metals inadvertently provided by phosphorus fertilisers: movement, chemical fractions and mass balances in contrasting acidic soils",
abstract = "The frequent use of phosphorus (P) fertilisers accompanied by nitrogen and potassium sources may lead to a serious long-term environmental issue because of the presence of potentially hazardous trace metals (TM) in P fertilisers and unknown effects on the TM chemical fractions in agricultural soils. A 16-month-long column experiment was conducted to investigate the mobility and chemical forms of Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Zn introduced into a Mollisol and an Andisol through surface incorporation (0–2 cm) of triple superphosphate (TSP) fertiliser. The effects of urea and potassium chloride (KCl) applications were investigated as well. After 15 cycles of 300-mm irrigation, TSP addition increased the 4 M HNO3 extractable TM concentration in the upper (0–5 cm) section of soils. Beyond this depth, metals showed no significant mobility, with minimal leaching losses (< 1.9{\%}, 25-cm depth). The TM chemical forms in the 0–5 cm section were significantly (p < 0.01) affected by the soil type and fertilisers addition. Cadmium, Ni, and Zn were the elements which appeared in a larger proportion (up to 30{\%}) in the most labile fraction (KNO3 extractable) in fertilised soils. The impact of urea depended on the nitrification-related changes in soil pH, while fertilisation with KCl tended to increase the KNO3 fraction of most metals probably due to K+ exchange reactions. Chromium remained minimally affected by the urea and KCl applications since this contaminant is strongly bound to the less labile solid phases. The low mobility of TM was governed mainly by their interaction with the solid phases rather than by their speciation at soil pH. The mass balance showed that the geochemical processes underwent in time by the P fertiliser increased the amount of TM extracted by the chemical fractionation scheme, therefore the reaction period of TSP with soil particles should be taken into account for evaluating TM availability. Long-term soil fertilisation could inadvertently contribute to an increased concentration and availability of these P fertilisers-born contaminants in the cultivated layer of acidic soils.",
keywords = "Heavy metals, Sequential extraction, Soil contamination, Triple superphosphate",
author = "Mauricio Molina-Roco and M{\'o}nica Antil{\'e}n and Nicol{\'a}s Arancibia-Miranda and Karen Manqui{\'a}n-Cerda and {Escudey Castro}, {Aldo M.} and {Escudey Castro}, {Aldo M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s10653-018-0115-y",
language = "English",
pages = "1--19",
journal = "Environmental Geochemistry and Health",
issn = "0269-4042",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distribution of contaminant trace metals inadvertently provided by phosphorus fertilisers

T2 - Environmental Geochemistry and Health

AU - Molina-Roco, Mauricio

AU - Antilén, Mónica

AU - Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolás

AU - Manquián-Cerda, Karen

AU - Escudey Castro, Aldo M.

AU - Escudey Castro, Aldo M.

PY - 2018/6/6

Y1 - 2018/6/6

N2 - The frequent use of phosphorus (P) fertilisers accompanied by nitrogen and potassium sources may lead to a serious long-term environmental issue because of the presence of potentially hazardous trace metals (TM) in P fertilisers and unknown effects on the TM chemical fractions in agricultural soils. A 16-month-long column experiment was conducted to investigate the mobility and chemical forms of Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Zn introduced into a Mollisol and an Andisol through surface incorporation (0–2 cm) of triple superphosphate (TSP) fertiliser. The effects of urea and potassium chloride (KCl) applications were investigated as well. After 15 cycles of 300-mm irrigation, TSP addition increased the 4 M HNO3 extractable TM concentration in the upper (0–5 cm) section of soils. Beyond this depth, metals showed no significant mobility, with minimal leaching losses (< 1.9%, 25-cm depth). The TM chemical forms in the 0–5 cm section were significantly (p < 0.01) affected by the soil type and fertilisers addition. Cadmium, Ni, and Zn were the elements which appeared in a larger proportion (up to 30%) in the most labile fraction (KNO3 extractable) in fertilised soils. The impact of urea depended on the nitrification-related changes in soil pH, while fertilisation with KCl tended to increase the KNO3 fraction of most metals probably due to K+ exchange reactions. Chromium remained minimally affected by the urea and KCl applications since this contaminant is strongly bound to the less labile solid phases. The low mobility of TM was governed mainly by their interaction with the solid phases rather than by their speciation at soil pH. The mass balance showed that the geochemical processes underwent in time by the P fertiliser increased the amount of TM extracted by the chemical fractionation scheme, therefore the reaction period of TSP with soil particles should be taken into account for evaluating TM availability. Long-term soil fertilisation could inadvertently contribute to an increased concentration and availability of these P fertilisers-born contaminants in the cultivated layer of acidic soils.

AB - The frequent use of phosphorus (P) fertilisers accompanied by nitrogen and potassium sources may lead to a serious long-term environmental issue because of the presence of potentially hazardous trace metals (TM) in P fertilisers and unknown effects on the TM chemical fractions in agricultural soils. A 16-month-long column experiment was conducted to investigate the mobility and chemical forms of Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Zn introduced into a Mollisol and an Andisol through surface incorporation (0–2 cm) of triple superphosphate (TSP) fertiliser. The effects of urea and potassium chloride (KCl) applications were investigated as well. After 15 cycles of 300-mm irrigation, TSP addition increased the 4 M HNO3 extractable TM concentration in the upper (0–5 cm) section of soils. Beyond this depth, metals showed no significant mobility, with minimal leaching losses (< 1.9%, 25-cm depth). The TM chemical forms in the 0–5 cm section were significantly (p < 0.01) affected by the soil type and fertilisers addition. Cadmium, Ni, and Zn were the elements which appeared in a larger proportion (up to 30%) in the most labile fraction (KNO3 extractable) in fertilised soils. The impact of urea depended on the nitrification-related changes in soil pH, while fertilisation with KCl tended to increase the KNO3 fraction of most metals probably due to K+ exchange reactions. Chromium remained minimally affected by the urea and KCl applications since this contaminant is strongly bound to the less labile solid phases. The low mobility of TM was governed mainly by their interaction with the solid phases rather than by their speciation at soil pH. The mass balance showed that the geochemical processes underwent in time by the P fertiliser increased the amount of TM extracted by the chemical fractionation scheme, therefore the reaction period of TSP with soil particles should be taken into account for evaluating TM availability. Long-term soil fertilisation could inadvertently contribute to an increased concentration and availability of these P fertilisers-born contaminants in the cultivated layer of acidic soils.

KW - Heavy metals

KW - Sequential extraction

KW - Soil contamination

KW - Triple superphosphate

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048039784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048039784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10653-018-0115-y

DO - 10.1007/s10653-018-0115-y

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 19

JO - Environmental Geochemistry and Health

JF - Environmental Geochemistry and Health

SN - 0269-4042

ER -